txchnologist:

Making Legs For Future Robotic Animal Assistants

University of South Florida computer engineer Luther Palmer is working on one of the big problems in robotics—creating legs that can move over all different types of terrain that a machine would find out in the real world. His team at the Biomorphic Robotics Lab is doing intensive computer modeling and taking tips from horses and humans on agile locomotion.

The team’s vision, like many other roboticists, is to imbue the best movement ideas developed through evolution into their machines. Palmer writes on his lab’s website that in the future, “robotic canines will gallop up stairs and over collapsed beams in burning buildings, locating occupants for rescue personnel.”

He also sees a time of robotic horses to carry heavy loads, cockroaches to conduct surreptitious surveillance and gophers to prepare alien worlds for human habitation. 

See the National Science Foundation video  and one for Palmer’s RecoRoach below.

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dontbeanassbutt:

moc-tod-ffuts-modnar:

iamtonysexual:

sherlock-mania:

remember-pants-terezi:

heyxkids:

YOU CANT CHANGE THE VOLUME OF THE VOICE IN YOUR HEAD

FUCKING TRY I DARE YOU

ITS IMPOSSIBLE AND ITS REALLY FUCKING WITH MY MIND SOMEONE HUG ME

I CAN MAKE IT SCREAM WITHOUT GETTING LOUDER

H E L P

Holy shit whispering is the same volume as shouting as loud as I can

what have you done

We think in concepts

Concepts have no volume

Because a thought is the loudest silence of all.

whoa there socrates

I can change the volume in my head? I’ve also heard people saying they can’t hear accents or distinct voices when they read but I think it’s common?

avianrecon:

Kestrel family in England. 

Source.

skunkbear:

Math Is Pretty

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates 3D fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

paisleydanger:

P

whole-mango:

neurotoxinsonline:

averyhoppybun:

fiddlekid:

sixpenceee:

A phone case that looks like a gigantic isopod. I have no words.

Oh my god

why

need

Well nobody would try to steal it, that’s for sure. 

I NEED THIS

whoisyourpaddy:

well, now I know what I’m doing every time a car alarm goes off

ferr0uswheel:

ryanandmath:

Imagine you wanted to measure the coastline of Great Britain. You might remember from calculus that straight lines can make a pretty good approximation of curves, so you decide that you’re going to estimate the length of the coast using straight lines of the length of 100km (not a very good estimate, but it’s a start). You finish, and you come up with a total costal length of 2800km. And you’re pretty happy. Now, you have a friend who also for some reason wants to measure the length of the coast of Great Britain. And she goes out and measures, but this time using straight lines of the length 50km and comes up with a total costal length of 3400km. Hold up! How can she have gotten such a dramatically different number?

It turns out that due to the fractal-like nature of the coast of Great Britain, the smaller the measurement that is used, the larger the coastline length will be become. Empirically, if we started to make the measurements smaller and smaller, the coastal length will increase without limit. This is a problem! And this problem is known as the coastline paradox.

By how fractals are defined, straight lines actually do not provide as much information about them as they do with other “nicer” curves. What is interesting though is that while the length of the curve may be impossible to measure, the area it encloses does converge to some value, as demonstrated by the Sierpinski curve, pictured above. For this reason, while it is a difficult reason to talk about how long the coastline of a country may be, it is still possible to get a good estimate of the total land mass that the country occupies. This phenomena was studied in detail by Benoit Mandelbrot in his paper “How Long is the Coast of Britain" and motivated many of connections between nature and fractals in his later work.

that’s an interesting paradox. fractals solve every problem.